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Part I - Domains of accurate interpersonal perception

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2016

Judith A. Hall
Affiliation:
Northeastern University, Boston
Marianne Schmid Mast
Affiliation:
Université de Lausanne, Switzerland
Tessa V. West
Affiliation:
New York University
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Summary

Abstract

Research on people’s accuracy in perceiving other people’s states, traits, and social attributes has existed for over 100 years. In the past few decades, however, it has exploded into a vibrant, interdisciplinary, and international pursuit with relevance to all areas of social, interpersonal, and intrapersonal life. However, researchers typically work within narrowly defined traditions within the field. The present volume brings these areas together to describe method, theory, and findings for seven content domains (judging emotions, thoughts and feelings, truth versus lie, personality, social attributes, others’ views of self, and group attitudes). Correlates at the group, individual, and situational levels are discussed, as well as the basic question: how accurate are people in judging other people? The strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in this field are discussed, and directions for future research are offered.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

References

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Hartwig, M., & Bond, C. F. Jr. (2014). Lie detection from multiple cues: A meta-analysis. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 28, 661676.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoekert, M., Kahn, R. S., Pijnenborg, M., & Aleman, A. (2007). Impaired recognition and expression of emotional prosody in schizophrenia: Review and meta-analysis. Schizophrenia Research, 96, 135145.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kirkland, R. A., Peterson, E., Baker, C. A., Miller, S., & Pulos, S. (2013). Meta-analysis reveals adult female superiority in “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” Test. North American Journal of Psychology, 15, 121146.Google Scholar
Kohler, C. G., Hoffman, L. J., Eastman, L. B., Healey, K., & Moberg, P. J. (2011). Facial emotion perception in depression and bipolar disorder: a quantitative review. Psychiatry Research, 188, 303309.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kohler, C. G., Walker, J. B., Martin, E. A., Healey, K. M., & Moberg, P. J. (2009). Facial emotion perception in schizophrenia: a meta-analytic review. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 36, 10091019.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kok, T. B., Post, W. J., Tucha, O., de Bont, E. S. J. M., Kamps, W. A., & Kingma, A. (2014). Social competence in children with brain disorders: A meta-analytic review. Neuropsychology Review, 24, 219235.Google ScholarPubMed
Kurtz, M. M., & Richardson, C. L. (2012). Social cognitive training for schizophrenia: A meta-analytic investigation of controlled research. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 38, 10921104.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lavoie, M., Plana, I., Lacroix, J. B., Godmaire-Duhaime, F., Jackson, P. L., & Achim, A. M. (2013). Social cognition in first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia: A meta-analysis. Psychiatry Research, 209, 129135.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Luke, N., & Banerjee, R. (2013). Differentiated associations between childhood maltreatment experiences and social understanding: A meta-analysis and systematic review. Developmental Review, 33, 128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marsh, A. A., & Blair, R. J. R. (2008). Deficits in facial affect recognition among antisocial populations: A meta-analysis. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 32, 454465.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McClure, E. B. (2000). A meta-analytic review of sex differences in facial expression processing and their development in infants, children, and adolescents. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 424453.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Merten, J. (2005). Culture, gender and the recognition of the basic emotions. Psychologia, 48, 306316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, A. E., Dickens, G. L., & Picchioni, M. M. (2014). Facial emotion processing in borderline personality disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Neuropsychology Review, 24, 166184.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J. (2008). The clinical significance of subjective memory complaints in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and dementia: A meta-analysis. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 23, 11911202.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., & Kakkadasam, V. (2011). Ability of nurses to identify depression in primary care, secondary care, and nursing homesA meta-analysis of routine clinical accuracy. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 48, 359368.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Meader, N., Bird, V., & Rizzo, M. (2012). Clinical recognition and recording of alcohol disorders by clinicians in primary and secondary care: A meta-analysis. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 201, 93100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, A. J., Meader, N., & Pentzek, M. (2011). Clinical recognition of dementia and cognitive impairment in primary care: A meta-analysis of physician accuracy. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 124, 165183.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Rao, S., & Vaze, A. (2010). Do primary care physicians have particular difficulty identifying late-life depression? A meta-analysis stratified by age. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 79, 285294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Rao, S., & Vaze, A. (2011). Can general practitioners identify people with distress and mild depression? A meta-analysis of clinical accuracy. Journal of Affective Disorders, 130, 2636.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Vaze, A., & Rao, S. (2009). Clinical diagnosis of depression in primary care: A meta-analysis. Lancet, 374, 609619.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murphy, N. A., & Hall, J. A. (2011). Intelligence and nonverbal sensitivity: A meta-analysis. Intelligence, 39, 5463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nummenmaa, L., & Calvo, M. G. (2015 ). Dissociation between recognition and detection advantage for facial expressions: A meta-analysis. Emotion, 15, 243256.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
O’Toole, M. S., Hougaard, E., & Mennin, D. S. (2013). Social anxiety and emotion knowledge. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 27, 98108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Plana, I., Lavoie, M., Battaglia, M., & Achim, A. M. (2014). A meta-analysis and scoping review of social cognition performance in social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 28, 169177.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruffman, T., Henry, J. D., Livingstone, V., & Phillips, L. H. (2008). A meta-analytic review of emotion recognition and aging: Implications for neuropsychological models of aging. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 32, 863881.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Samamé, C., Martino, D. J., & Strejilevich, S. A. (2012). Social cognition in euthymic biopolar disorder: Systematic review and meta-analytic approach. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 125, 266280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sayla, G. N., Vella, L., Armstrong, C. C., Penn, D. L., & Twamley, E. W. (2013). Deficits in domains of social cognition in schizophrenia: A meta-analysis of the empirical evidence. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 39, 979992.Google Scholar
Shahrestani, S., Kemp, A. H., & Guastella, A. J. (2013). The impact of a single administration of intranasal oxytocin on the recognition of basic emotions in humans: A meta-analysis. Neuropsychopharmacology, 38, 19291936.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thompson, A. E., & Voyer, D. (2014). Sex differences in the ability to recognize non-verbal displays of emotion: A meta-analysis. Cognition and Emotion, 28, 11641195.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tskhay, K. O., & Rule, N. O. (2013). Accuracy in categorizing perceptually ambiguous groups: A review and meta-analysis. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 17, 7286.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Uljarevic, M., & Hamilton, A. (2013). Recognition of emotions in autism: A formal meta-analysis. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43, 15171526.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Hemert, D. A., Poortinga, Y. H., & van de Vijver, F. J. R. (2007). Emotion and culture: A meta-analysis. Cognition and Emotion, 21, 913943.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ventura, J., Wood, R. C., Jimenez, A. M., & Hellemann, G. S. (2013). Neurocognition and symptoms identify links between facial recognition and emotion processing in schizophrenia: Meta-analytic findings. Schizophrenia Research, 151, 7884.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wagner, M. F., Milner, J. S., McCarthy, R. J., Crouch, J. L., McCanne, T. R., & Skowronski, J. J. (2014). Facial emotion recognition accuracy and child physical abuse: An experiment and a meta-analysis. Psychology of Violence, 5, 154162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Meta-analyses on interpersonal accuracy

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Marsh, A. A., & Blair, R. J. R. (2008). Deficits in facial affect recognition among antisocial populations: A meta-analysis. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 32, 454465.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McClure, E. B. (2000). A meta-analytic review of sex differences in facial expression processing and their development in infants, children, and adolescents. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 424453.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Merten, J. (2005). Culture, gender and the recognition of the basic emotions. Psychologia, 48, 306316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, A. E., Dickens, G. L., & Picchioni, M. M. (2014). Facial emotion processing in borderline personality disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Neuropsychology Review, 24, 166184.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J. (2008). The clinical significance of subjective memory complaints in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and dementia: A meta-analysis. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 23, 11911202.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., & Kakkadasam, V. (2011). Ability of nurses to identify depression in primary care, secondary care, and nursing homesA meta-analysis of routine clinical accuracy. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 48, 359368.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Meader, N., Bird, V., & Rizzo, M. (2012). Clinical recognition and recording of alcohol disorders by clinicians in primary and secondary care: A meta-analysis. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 201, 93100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, A. J., Meader, N., & Pentzek, M. (2011). Clinical recognition of dementia and cognitive impairment in primary care: A meta-analysis of physician accuracy. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 124, 165183.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Rao, S., & Vaze, A. (2010). Do primary care physicians have particular difficulty identifying late-life depression? A meta-analysis stratified by age. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 79, 285294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Rao, S., & Vaze, A. (2011). Can general practitioners identify people with distress and mild depression? A meta-analysis of clinical accuracy. Journal of Affective Disorders, 130, 2636.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mitchell, A. J., Vaze, A., & Rao, S. (2009). Clinical diagnosis of depression in primary care: A meta-analysis. Lancet, 374, 609619.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murphy, N. A., & Hall, J. A. (2011). Intelligence and nonverbal sensitivity: A meta-analysis. Intelligence, 39, 5463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nummenmaa, L., & Calvo, M. G. (2015 ). Dissociation between recognition and detection advantage for facial expressions: A meta-analysis. Emotion, 15, 243256.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
O’Toole, M. S., Hougaard, E., & Mennin, D. S. (2013). Social anxiety and emotion knowledge. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 27, 98108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Plana, I., Lavoie, M., Battaglia, M., & Achim, A. M. (2014). A meta-analysis and scoping review of social cognition performance in social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 28, 169177.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruffman, T., Henry, J. D., Livingstone, V., & Phillips, L. H. (2008). A meta-analytic review of emotion recognition and aging: Implications for neuropsychological models of aging. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 32, 863881.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Samamé, C., Martino, D. J., & Strejilevich, S. A. (2012). Social cognition in euthymic biopolar disorder: Systematic review and meta-analytic approach. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 125, 266280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sayla, G. N., Vella, L., Armstrong, C. C., Penn, D. L., & Twamley, E. W. (2013). Deficits in domains of social cognition in schizophrenia: A meta-analysis of the empirical evidence. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 39, 979992.Google Scholar
Shahrestani, S., Kemp, A. H., & Guastella, A. J. (2013). The impact of a single administration of intranasal oxytocin on the recognition of basic emotions in humans: A meta-analysis. Neuropsychopharmacology, 38, 19291936.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thompson, A. E., & Voyer, D. (2014). Sex differences in the ability to recognize non-verbal displays of emotion: A meta-analysis. Cognition and Emotion, 28, 11641195.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tskhay, K. O., & Rule, N. O. (2013). Accuracy in categorizing perceptually ambiguous groups: A review and meta-analysis. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 17, 7286.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Uljarevic, M., & Hamilton, A. (2013). Recognition of emotions in autism: A formal meta-analysis. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43, 15171526.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Hemert, D. A., Poortinga, Y. H., & van de Vijver, F. J. R. (2007). Emotion and culture: A meta-analysis. Cognition and Emotion, 21, 913943.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ventura, J., Wood, R. C., Jimenez, A. M., & Hellemann, G. S. (2013). Neurocognition and symptoms identify links between facial recognition and emotion processing in schizophrenia: Meta-analytic findings. Schizophrenia Research, 151, 7884.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wagner, M. F., Milner, J. S., McCarthy, R. J., Crouch, J. L., McCanne, T. R., & Skowronski, J. J. (2014). Facial emotion recognition accuracy and child physical abuse: An experiment and a meta-analysis. Psychology of Violence, 5, 154162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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