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Part III - Conclusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2016

Judith A. Hall
Affiliation:
Northeastern University, Boston
Marianne Schmid Mast
Affiliation:
Université de Lausanne, Switzerland
Tessa V. West
Affiliation:
New York University
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Summary

Abstract

Over the past decades, there has been increased interest in and recognition of the importance of interpersonal accuracy (IPA) for successful social interaction. Yet, while there has been some success in creating instruments that assess individuals’ accuracy in inferring others’ personality, affect and emotions, thoughts and feelings, deception, and social affordances, there have been no systematic efforts to examine the degree of overlap between these measures. The relatively few attempts in which relationships have been reported have shown surprisingly low correlations. Here, we utilized meta-analytic techniques to map out how different assessments of IPA are related to each other and to evaluate the question whether there is a global IPA skill. The results revealed a modest but significant overall correlation that was moderated by domain and nonverbal channels available in each measure. Implications for a unified construct of IPA are discussed.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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