Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-bjz6k Total loading time: 0.278 Render date: 2022-05-21T20:04:49.386Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

6 - Vocal learning in wild and domesticated zebra finches: Signature cues for kin recognition or epiphenomena?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2010

Charles T. Snowdon
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Martine Hausberger
Affiliation:
Université de Rennes I, France
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

In the mid-1960s Klaus Immelmann began a series of experiments with domesticated zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) that led to seminal contributions to two related fields, song learning and sexual imprinting. Immelmann (1969) manipulated the auditory and social experiences of young males in their first 100 days of life and found that those denied any contact with singing males failed to sing the normal zebra finch song at adulthood. He concluded that song in this species, like that of most songbirds, must be learned. When he isolated young from foster parents (Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata var. domesticaj) at different ages he found that the sensitive phase for song acquisition began as early as 25 days of age, about a week after fledging, and ended around 80 days of age, around the onset of sexual maturity. Furthermore, young males did not learn from just any singing adult, but preferred to copy from the male with whom they formed a personal bond. In most instances this was the father or foster father and the bond was based primarily on the provisioning relationship, the most basic filial bond. Immelmann (1969) hypothesized that wild zebra finches would be likely to learn the songs of their fathers, and an early end to the sensitive phase was necessary in order to prevent learning from heterospecific estrildines.

The experimental possibilities raised by Immelmann's intriguing study of song eventually stimulated a steady series of follow-up experiments by other researchers, in particular, by P. J. B. Slater and coworkers, who used song learning in domesticated zebra finches as a model for teasing apart the subtle interactions involved in the development of behaviour (for a review, see Slater et al. 1988).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
10
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×