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Further reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Rosemary Horrox
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
W. Mark Ormrod
Affiliation:
University of York
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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