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Chapter 24 - Sleepiness in children

from Section 2 - Sleep Disorders and Excessive Sleepiness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Michael J. Thorpy
Affiliation:
Sleep-Wake Disorders Center, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA
Michel Billiard
Affiliation:
Guide Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, France
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Summary

Hypersomnia is characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or prolonged nighttime sleep that affects the everyday life of the patient. Clinical surveys have reported EDS as a complaint in up to 68% of normal high-school children. Causes of EDS are divided into three categories: insufficient nighttime sleep, fragmented nighttime sleep, and an increased need of sleep. Pediatric daytime sleepiness scale (PDSS) is a recently introduced validated measure for assessing sleepiness in children. Management of disorders that may coexist with hypersomnia of central origin such as obstructive sleep apnea, psychiatric disorders, medications, and circadian rhythm disorders will require specific therapeutic interventions, but need to be done for optimal outcome in children with narcolepsy. The general approach to the treatment of childhood narcolepsy and other hypersomnias of central origin is based on the adult experience.
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Chapter
Information
Sleepiness
Causes, Consequences and Treatment
, pp. 262 - 276
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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