Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-kpqxq Total loading time: 0.262 Render date: 2022-12-08T23:22:44.321Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

8 - Australia, Asia and the New Regionalism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 October 2021

Get access

Summary

On 17 January 1996, Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating gave the 14th Singapore Lecture after being welcomed by Singapore's Deputy Prime Minister Tony Tan who referred to Mr Keating as “Australia's most Asia-oriented Prime Minister”. Prime Minister Keating was the second of four Australian leaders to give a Singapore Lecture following Prime Minister Bob Hawke in 1987. His lecture is a clear exposition of why Australia has turned its focus to Asia. It also reflects the optimism at the time about regionalism, with Keating regarding APEC as the “new model for regional cooperation” particularly suited for the post-Cold War era.

It is a great honour to have been asked to give this lecture and I thank Professor Chan Heng Chee and the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies for the invitation. Australia has had a long and productive association with the Institute over many years.

I also want to thank the Government of Singapore for its support for the lecture and, especially, Deputy Prime Minister Tony Tan for his courtesy to me in chairing it today.

This is my third visit to Singapore as Prime Minister and it is always a pleasure to come here. There is an energy about Singapore which flows from people who are conscious of the inevitability of change and who are trying to shape that change for the better.

I admire that Singapore, perhaps more than any other place in the world, teaches the vital lesson that we cannot prepare for the future until we know what we want it to be.

This has been the distinctive principle guiding Singapore's modern history: the same principle that some time ago began to guide Australia through the present era. When you face things and begin to do what must be done, you liberate ideas about what can be done. This great era of change has meant that as we approach the centenary of Australia's nationhood a new, stronger and clearer vision of our future has begun to emerge. And it now goes without saying that much of the future we see—we see in the Asia-Pacific.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×