Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-9hf5z Total loading time: 0.445 Render date: 2023-02-04T13:22:37.103Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Book contents

Viola’s Telemachy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2022

Emma Smith
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Get access

Summary

From the earliest days, the Homeric poems have been read as educative models, and in particular the Telemachy of the Odyssey has offered a version of paideia (education, learning) in the moral education of Telemachus, as he is prepared, and prepares himself, to aid his father on Odysseus’ return and, over all, to be a fitting heir. In varying degrees, that theme of educative growth continued through the romance tradition that descended from the Odyssey.1 We teachers of literature have often thought of ourselves as imitating the pedagogical role of Athene and her mortal disguises in the shapes of Mentes and, especially, Mentor, as she provides an educative guide for Telemachus during his process of maturation. Shakespeare the dramatist in some ways participates in this broadly didactic tradition of literature, and indeed he repeatedly studies youth in the process of maturation, from his extended portrayal of Prince Hal in the history plays through his greatly foreshortened but vivid picture of Miranda in The Tempest, although his Mentor figures are perhaps harder to take seriously than his youths. One thinks of such inept pedagogical guides as Holofernes, Falstaff, Polonius and Volumnia. If there is any historicity at all in the legend of Shakespeare as country schoolmaster who turned to playwrighting, that early experience must have left him with considerable scepticism about the pedagogical role of moral guide, to judge from his dramatic portrayals of mentors.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare Survey 75
Othello
, pp. 281 - 286
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×