Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-8vdwt Total loading time: 0.452 Render date: 2021-10-26T06:57:38.007Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Shylock and the Shrew: Victorian Shakespeare and Nineteenth-Century Spain

from History and Memory: Criticism and Reception

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2014

Clara Calvo
Affiliation:
The University of Murcia
Get access

Summary

Balthazar. Hieronimo, methinks a comedy were better. Hieronimus.

A comedy?

Fie, comedies are fit for common wits

(The Spanish Tragedy, IV, 1.150–151)

Memory, according to George Eliot in Middlemarch, is what makes of a man's past not simply dead history. Memory, continues Eliot, is far from being mere outworn preparation for the present; it is, rather, a wound that reopens man's past. Eliot's words prompt me to dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Inga-Stina Ewbank, because her work will always remain in my memory certainly as more than outworn preparation for the present, for its seminal influence in the history of Shakespearean criticism in Europe. In one of her latest pieces, included in a collection of essays on Victorian Shakespeare, she drew attention to the need of studying European reception of Shakespearean comedy on its own, trying to chart the path it followed, a path which runs somehow parallel to, but is not identical with, the main road of Shakespearean reception, which, in the nineteenth century at least, was mostly concerned with the tragedies. This is why I feel that perhaps there is something in the fate of Shakespearean comedy in nineteenth-century Spain that is worth a little detour.

In 1879, the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford finally gave Britain a playhouse centrally devoted to the performance of the plays of Shakespeare. The play chosen for the opening performance was, as it is well known, Much Ado about Nothing.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare in Europe
History and Memory
, pp. 139 - 148
Publisher: Jagiellonian University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×