Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-4hhp2 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-29T13:21:08.087Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

11 - Driving Innovation in Health Care

External Evidence, Decision-Making, and Leadership

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2022

Mark Pauly
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Flaura Winston
Affiliation:
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Mary Naylor
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
Kevin Volpp
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania Health System
Lawton Robert Burns
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Ralph Muller
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania Health System
David Asch
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Rachel Werner
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Bimal Desai
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Krisda Chaiyachati
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Benjamin Chartock
Affiliation:
Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
Get access

Summary

The bulk of medical care system management in the United States does not ground decisions in use of available, high quality evidence. The previous chapters in this book demonstrate both that there sometimes is a rich scientific foundation in health care organization, delivery, and financing that could, if applied, lead to better outcomes, and that sometimes there is little or no evidence on effectiveness of interventions. However, we also observed that the bulk of health care management in the United States does not ground decisions in evidence, using it if available and taking uncertainty into account if not – instead “magical thinking” is often used to make choices.1 Ironically, management holds evidence in high esteem for decision-making by clinicians. In this chapter, we explore why management holds itself to a lower standard regarding its organizational, staffing, and planning choices, seeing experience, intuition, and opinions as good-enough evidence for decisions. We explore what needs to happen for this to change.

Type
Chapter
Information
Seemed Like a Good Idea
Alchemy versus Evidence-Based Approaches to Healthcare Management Innovation
, pp. 369 - 397
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×