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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2010

Thomas Dixon
Affiliation:
Queen Mary University of London
Geoffrey Cantor
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Stephen Pumfrey
Affiliation:
University of Lancaster
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Chapter
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Science and Religion
New Historical Perspectives
, pp. 299 - 310
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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