Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-n9lxd Total loading time: 0.908 Render date: 2022-10-03T18:44:00.217Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

3 - Judicial Engagement with Science in the Environmental Case Law of the International Court of Justice

from Part II - Techniques for Judicial Engagement with Science in the Practice of International Courts and Tribunals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

Katalin Sulyok
Affiliation:
ELTE University, Budapest
Get access

Summary

This chapter identifies an evolving trend in the ICJ’s engagement with science, which has started with the marginalization of scientific evidence, continued with making superficial evidentiary assessments, but ultimately demonstrated an increasing willingness to engage with science. As to framing techniques, mandating the parties’ negotiations in science-intensive questions, the prevalence of finding procedural breaches as well as decoupling the notion of ’risk’ from substantive, scientific criteria will be discussed. In terms of fact-finding, the chapter addresses evolving procedures for taking expert evidence, and applicable standards of proof. The causal analysis evidences the Court’s struggle with establishing the requisite proof in cases of uncertain causation. As to the standard and extent of review, the study examines the reasonableness test, and defends the majority's solution in the Whaling in the Antarctic case based on insights from Science and Technology Studies.

Type
Chapter
Information
Science and Judicial Reasoning
The Legitimacy of International Environmental Adjudication
, pp. 69 - 117
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×