Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-pftt2 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-26T13:32:02.670Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 13 - Day 7

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2022

Get access

Summary

MM40/69/3188 Musical Instrument

The elders identified this object as a musical instrument called n//uqace (figure 13.1). They said it is made from the wood of a mongongo nut or manketti tree (Schinziophyton rautanenii). The bent sticks are made from brandybush (Grewia flava), and the strings from the sinew of any animal. Gaps are sealed with beeswax or ground lily bulb (Ammocharis coranica) (figure 13.2). It is made by men and played by men and women. A small strung bow was inside the object, but the elders said that it was used to play a different instrument because they play this instrument with their fingers and thumbs, as demonstrated by Joa Cwi (figure 13.3). It is generally made by the person who plays it, and it may be played at any time, including all through the night, not only on special occasions.

MM40/69/1429 Musical Bow

We presented the elders with a bow labelled as a musical instrument. They explained that the bow used for music is also used for hunting. Only men play the bow, and if yours does not make a good sound you can borrow someone else’s. A porcupine (Hystrix africaeaustralis) quill or piece of grass is used to play it. Tsamkxao ≠Oma demonstrated how the mouth is opened and closed to make different sounds (figure 13.4). You control your breathing and produce different sounds from your throat.

MM40/69/1645 Horns Used as a Container For a Substance Conferring Luck and as a Whistle

The elders were shown a group of horns, and explained that two of these horns are carried by a man. One contains medicine to stop the rain and to bring you luck, and the other is empty because it is used as a whistle (figure 13.5). We asked about the rain charm. What is the powder inside made from? They replied that when lightning strikes something you will find things that look like ice, and you collect them. You boil them in water until all the water has evaporated. You pound the remaining substance and store it in the horn. It will make you lucky.

Type
Chapter
Information
San Elders Speak
Ancestral Knowledge of the Kalahari San
, pp. 237 - 253
Publisher: Wits University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×