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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 March 2020

Angela Joya
Affiliation:
University of Oregon
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The Roots of Revolt
A Political Economy of Egypt from Nasser to Mubarak
, pp. 237 - 268
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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