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12 - Sickle Chest Syndromes in Pregnancy

from Section 3 - Pulmonary Conditions Not Specific to Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2020

Stephen E. Lapinsky
Affiliation:
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto
Lauren A. Plante
Affiliation:
Drexel University Hospital, Philadelphia
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Summary

common haemoglobinopathy, affecting 283 000 infants born annually. Sickle cell carriers are found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, the Mediterranean, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. Estimated frequency for sickle cell trait (HbAS) varies by ethnicity: 1:10 for African-Carribeans, 1:4 for West Africans, 1:100 for Cypriots and 1:100 for Pakistani, Indian. Haemoglobin S is created by the substitution of valine for glutamic acid (CAG → GTG), in the β-globin gene at position 6.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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