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25 - Sex beyond and after fertility

from SECTION 6 - SEX BEYOND AND AFTER FERTILITY

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2014

Susan Bewley
Affiliation:
St Thomas’s Hospital, London
William Ledger
Affiliation:
University of New South Wales, Sydney
Dimitrios Nikolaou
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London
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Summary

David Barlow: Catherine, you mentioned in your presentation that health carers and health professionals can have difficulty recognising that older people have sexual needs. Do you know whether there is similar evidence among health carers and professionals dealing with younger people in healthcare or who have been in hospital for many, many months. Do their carers recognise that they may also have sexual needs?

Catherine Coulson: I certainly have heard it from both sides: disabled people referred to me in the psychosexual clinic where the subject has come up. But I suspect that, generally speaking, it is more comfortable to ignore it, don't you? I did not look at that specifically.

Mandish Dhanjal: Diana, why do you think the IUS [intrauterine system] uptake rate is so low considering it is such a suitable form of contraception and also has added healthcare benefits? I am sure that if you surveyed female gynaecologists, it would be the number one form of contraception they use themselves. Why do you think community general practitioners aren't suggesting that is a good contraceptive?

Diana Mansour: We did a survey recently looking at one particular general practice that we use for training, as well as our own service, and clearly showed that most primary care general practitioners underprescribe long-acting methods including the IUS. Even though there may be some enhanced service payment, they still say that it is too much of a hassle. Well, that is the first excuse they make.

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Reproductive Ageing , pp. 273 - 274
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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