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Part IV - The Social Context of Relationship Maintenance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2019

Brian G. Ogolsky
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
J. Kale Monk
Affiliation:
University of Missouri
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Chapter
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Relationship Maintenance
Theory, Process, and Context
, pp. 263 - 366
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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