Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-x5mqb Total loading time: 0.296 Render date: 2021-11-28T22:00:28.088Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

3 - The Ethical Significance of Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Amy Mullin
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

By now I have given an account of some misconceptions of pregnancy found in lay and academic culture, in chapter 1, and provided a corrective account of women's embodied experiences of pregnancy in chapter 2. This second chapter stressed both the planning and purposes that can guide pregnant women, and the accommodations they must make to features outside their control. In neither chapter did I focus attention on the relationship between a pregnant woman and the fetus inside her. I turn now to this relationship, which must be considered in its social context, as I ask about the ethical significance of pregnancy. In speaking of ethical significance, I mean to indicate anything that is relevant to practices of moral evaluation and moral judgment.

While many aspects of pregnancy have been ignored by philosophers, ethical questions about it garner considerable attention. However, most of this attention has been focused on situations where women and fetuses are posited as adversaries: either where abortion is considered or chosen or when pregnant women engage in behavior that harms fetuses. Ethical questions about pregnancy tend to be presented as questions about whether women are morally justified when they make decisions without taking into consideration the welfare of their fetuses. As feminist philosophers Vangie Bergum, Eugenie Gatens-Robinson and Catriona Mackenzie, demonstrate, this is not how most women think about abortion.

Type
Chapter
Information
Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare
Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor
, pp. 72 - 105
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×