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3 - From Hume to Mill

Recognition and Self-Control

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 October 2020

Axel Honneth
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
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Summary

This chapter shows that in the British intellectual tradition, the Scottish moralists, followed by Hume and Smith, saw reliance upon the opinion of others (“recognition”) in a completely different way than the French tradition. Instead of being viewed as something intrinsically negative and self-destructive, such reliance is described – sometimes with the same words – as something positive, contributing to epistemic and moral self-control. The central notions used in the British tradition to describe these positive effects of being dependent on others are “sympathy”, “inner spectator” and “impartial observer”. The chapter also shows that John Stuart Mill adopted the same line of thought by reserving a very positive role for the judgment of others. The chapter also attempts to identify sociopolitical reasons that may explain why such a positive understanding might have prevailed in British culture.

Type
Chapter
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Recognition
A Chapter in the History of European Ideas
, pp. 54 - 93
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • From Hume to Mill
  • Axel Honneth, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: Recognition
  • Online publication: 09 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108872775.003
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  • From Hume to Mill
  • Axel Honneth, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: Recognition
  • Online publication: 09 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108872775.003
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • From Hume to Mill
  • Axel Honneth, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: Recognition
  • Online publication: 09 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108872775.003
Available formats
×