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12 - Intermediality: Experiencing the Virtual Text

Órla Murphy
Affiliation:
University College Cork
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Summary

text … one word to rule them all and in the darkness bind them.

The internet and electronic media are edited and in turn edit and shape our experience of reading texts today. At present there is much interplay of a variety of media within cultural practice, in particular within reading, shaping and editing text or texts in their multiplicity of forms. This vibrancy and activity is balanced with an earnest revaluation of early digital textual scholarship and its methodologies which can serve to inform and guide the humanities community in its efforts to pursue its contemporary intellectual agenda.

A recent call for papers for a scholarly journal reflects this engagement:

[I]ntermediality is associated with the blurring of traditionally ascribed generic and formal boundaries through the incorporation of digital media into all forms of cultural practice and with the presence of one or more media in the space and form of another medium.

I suggest that a reappraisal of our boundaries and of our definition of what it means to be an audience for and creators of these texts needs to occur so that the perceived separation between technology and the humanist disciplines merges into a more successful scholarly partnership.

Intermediality in contemporary culture has led to the creation of new sites of encounter between texts in their burgeoning multiplicity of forms and the media through which, by which, and on which, they are represented.

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Publisher: Pickering & Chatto
First published in: 2014

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