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4 - After A Theory of Justice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Jon Mandle
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Albany
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Summary

A POLITICAL CONCEPTION OF JUSTICE

The publication of A Theory of Justice generated a huge secondary literature, a small portion of which we will examine in chapter 5. In a few cases, such as the changes to the formulation of the first principle prompted by criticisms made by H. L. A. Hart, Rawls responded directly by clarifying or revising elements of the theory. But by far the most significant developments in Rawls's work after A Theory of Justice were due to his own ultimate dissatisfaction with the argument for the congruence between the right and the good. This was an area that was – and continues to be – badly neglected in the secondary literature, and according to Samuel Freeman, “Rawls once said (in conversation) that he thought the congruence argument was one of the most original contributions he made in A Theory of Justice, and that he was puzzled why it did not attract more comment.” In this section, we will explore the problem he found in the congruence argument in A Theory of Justice and how this prompted him to develop the idea of a political conception of justice. In the next section, we will look at two areas where these developments allowed Rawls to strengthen the arguments made in A Theory of Justice, namely, the reliance on primary goods and the priority of the first principle over the second.

Type
Chapter
Information
Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice'
An Introduction
, pp. 142 - 169
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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References

The Reasonable in Justice as Fairness,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 29 (1999)
Larmore, Charles, The Morals of Modernity (Cambridge University Press, 1996), pp. 149–50CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolterstorff, Nicholas, “The Role of Religion in Decision and Discussion of Political Issues” in Religion in the Public Square: The Place of Religious Convictions in Political Debate, Audi, Robert and Wolterstorff, Nicholas, eds. (Rowman and Littlefield, 1997)Google Scholar
Eberle, Christopher, Religious Conviction in Liberal Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Freeman, Samuel, “Frontiers of Justice: The Capabilities Approach vs. Contractarianism,” Texas Law Review, 85 (2006), pp. 411–18Google Scholar
Barber, Benjamin, The Conquest of Politics (Princeton, 1988), p. 81Google Scholar
Gray, John, “Contractarian Method, Private Property and the Market Economy” in his Liberalisms: Essays in Political Philosophy (Routledge, 1989), p. 161Google Scholar
Clark, Barry and Gintis, Herbert, “Rawlsian Justice and Economic Systems,” Philosophy and Public Affairs, 7 (1978), p. 304Google Scholar
Meade, J. E., Liberty, Equality and Efficiency (New York University Press, 1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Krouse, Richard and McPherson, Michael, “Capitalism, ‘Property-Owning Democracy,’ and the Welfare State” in Democracy and the Welfare State, Gutmann, Amy, ed. (Princeton University Press, 1988)Google Scholar
Ron, Amit, “Visions of Democracy in a ‘Property-Owning Democracy’: Skelton to Rawls and Beyond,” History of Political Thought, 29 (2008)Google Scholar

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  • After A Theory of Justice
  • Jon Mandle, State University of New York, Albany
  • Book: Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice'
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511814099.006
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  • After A Theory of Justice
  • Jon Mandle, State University of New York, Albany
  • Book: Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice'
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511814099.006
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • After A Theory of Justice
  • Jon Mandle, State University of New York, Albany
  • Book: Rawls's 'A Theory of Justice'
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511814099.006
Available formats
×