Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-zts5g Total loading time: 0.675 Render date: 2021-10-23T15:31:00.278Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

3 - Trauma radiology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 February 2010

Richard Hopkins
Affiliation:
Cheltenham General Hospital
Carol Peden
Affiliation:
Royal United Hispital, Bath
Sanjay Gandhi
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Get access

Summary

Rapid assessment, diagnosis and treatment are essential as aortic injury is an unstable condition. Most patients are initially imaged with plain film radiography followed by computed tomography (CT) or angiography depending on initial radiographic findings and the spectrum of other injuries. Numerous signs on the chest X-ray have been described in association with traumatic aortic injury. Chest X-rays may detect potentially life-threatening injuries that require treatment, and pelvic films may demonstrate fractures of the pelvis that indicate the need for early blood transfusion. The chest X-ray or CT for blunt trauma can be divided into systems for the purposes of ensuring that all areas are looked at. The spleen is the most commonly injured organ in the abdomen, either the result of blunt abdominal trauma or penetrating injury. Ultrasound can demonstrate splenic laceration, adjacent fluid or splenic haematoma, but the technique is often limited by pain and patient immobility.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×