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1 - Questions about Questions

Framing the Key Issues

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2020

Lucas Payne Butler
Affiliation:
University of Maryland, College Park
Samuel Ronfard
Affiliation:
University of Toronto Mississauga
Kathleen H. Corriveau
Affiliation:
Boston University
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Summary

In this introductory chapter, we outline three broad questions of interest to researchers and educators, each of which provides a clear thread throughout the volume. First, where do questions come from, and how do children engage in questioning across development? Second, to what extent is questioning universal, and in what ways is it socialized? Third, what role does question-asking play in learning more broadly, in both formal and informal environments?

Type
Chapter
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The Questioning Child
Insights from Psychology and Education
, pp. 1 - 5
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Carey, S., and Gelman, R. (eds.) (1991). The epigenesis of mind: Essays in biology and cognition. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
Gopnik, A., and Schulz, L. (eds.) (2007). Causal learning: Psychology, philosophy, and computation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
Harris, P. L. (2012).Trusting what you’re told: How children learn from others. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Harris, P. L., Koenig, M. A., Corriveau, K. H., and Jaswal, V. K. (2018). Cognitive foundations of learning from testimony. Annual Review of Psychology, 69, 251–73. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-psych-122216-011710
Weisberg, D. S., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Golinkoff, R. M., Kittredge, A. K., and Klahr, D. (2015). Guided play: Principles and practices. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 25, 177–82. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0963721416645512

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