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Chapter 2 - Petitions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2020

Karin Bowie
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow
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Summary

Like the protestation, the petition helped to make extra-institutional opinion more visible in early modern Scotland. Petitions were a traditional tool for initiating dialogue, normally in humble terms that emphasised the pleas of the petitioner and the authority of the recipient. Buoyed by religious convictions, political petitioners in Scotland defied these norms by presenting conscientious arguments reinforced with signatures and crowds. They might even petition repeatedly when answers were unsatisfactory. Though these adversarial political activities capitalised on the conventional idea that a good prince should hear the grievances of his people, successive monarchs sought to constrain what they saw as seditious and tumultuous behaviour. This chapter traces episodes of assertive petitioning in Scotland, showing how petitioning stimulated and expressed opinions at large, especially under James VI and Charles I, and how the crown responded to these challenges with the suppression of unwelcome petitioning from the Restoration to the Revolution.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Petitions
  • Karin Bowie, University of Glasgow
  • Book: Public Opinion in Early Modern Scotland, c.1560–1707
  • Online publication: 21 December 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108918787.003
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  • Petitions
  • Karin Bowie, University of Glasgow
  • Book: Public Opinion in Early Modern Scotland, c.1560–1707
  • Online publication: 21 December 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108918787.003
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Petitions
  • Karin Bowie, University of Glasgow
  • Book: Public Opinion in Early Modern Scotland, c.1560–1707
  • Online publication: 21 December 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108918787.003
Available formats
×