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Part III - Representations of and in Revolution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 April 2018

Brady Wagoner
Affiliation:
Aalborg University, Denmark
Fathali M. Moghaddam
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Jaan Valsiner
Affiliation:
Aalborg University, Denmark
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Summary

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The Psychology of Radical Social Change
From Rage to Revolution
, pp. 187 - 290
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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