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23 - The Netherlands

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2013

Fokke Fernhout
Affiliation:
Associate Professor of Law, Maastricht University
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Summary

Preliminary note

The Netherlands attribute an exclusive right of legal representation or assistance in all major civil cases and major criminal cases to lawyers admitted to the Bar. Lawyers who are admitted to the Bar are subject to a duty of professional secrecy. This duty of professional secrecy has its counterpart in the attorney–client privilege. These lawyers can be self-employed or take up office with any firm, in which case certain requirements aiming at maintaining their professional independence have to be met.

Lawyers must comply with the Act on Advocates (Advocatenwet) and the ordinances enacted by the National Bar Council (Nederlandse Orde van Advocaten). The Bar's Code of Conduct has its basis in the Act on Advocates and serves as a guideline for all lawyers. Compliance is enforced in regionally organised disciplinary courts (raden van discipline), overseen by a central Court of Discipline (Hof van Discipline). The Bar itself is organised in regional associations according to the judicial districts of the district courts under the supervision of the Netherlands Bar Association. The regional associations and the national association are presided over by a regional and national dean (deken) respectively. The regional dean is assisted by a supervisory board.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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References

Hohfeld, W. N., Fundamental Legal Conceptions as Applied in Judicial Reasoning, and Other Legal Essays, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1923Google Scholar
Telders, C. H., ‘De advocaat als getuige’ (The Lawyer as a Witness), Preliminary report, Advocatenblad 1957
Fernhout, F. J., Het verschoningsrecht van getuigen in civiele zaken (The Attorney–Client Privilege in Civil Cases), Maastricht: Gianni, 2004, 225–41Google Scholar
Patijn, J. G., ‘Papieronderzoek in strafzaken’, preliminary advice for the Netherlands Lawyers Association, Handelingen NJV 1888, 281–327
Eysten, P. A. Wackie, ‘Advocaat-scheidingsmediator heeft wel verschoningsrecht’ (Lawyer–Mediator Enjoys the Privilege), Advocatenblad 2010, 72–3Google Scholar
Smit, T. Sillevis, ‘Rechters verdeeld over toelaten confraternele correspondentie’ (Courts Having Differing Views on Admitting Correspondence between Lawyers), Advocatenblad 2011
Spronken, T., ‘Verdediging in strafzaken’ (Defence in Criminal Cases), dissertation, Maastricht, 2001
Faure, M. G., Nelen, H., Fernhout, F. J. and Philipsen, N. J., Evaluatie tuchtrechtelijke handhaving, Wet ter voorkoming van Witwassen en Financiering van Terrorisme, The Hague: Boom Juridische uitgevers, 2009, 9–17Google Scholar
Aanwijzing toepassing opsporingsbevoegdheden en dwangmiddelen tegen advocaten, 7 March 2011, Stcrt. [Staatscourant, Dutch Government Gazette] 2011
Aanwijzing toepassing opsporingsbevoegdheden en dwangmiddelen tegen advocaten, 7 March 2011, Stcrt. 2011
Aantjes, M., ‘Geen online vrienden voor advocaten’ (No Online Friends for Lawyers), Advocatenblad 2012, no 2, 32–3

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  • The Netherlands
  • Compiled by The Bar of Brussels
  • Book: Professional Secrecy of Lawyers in Europe
  • Online publication: 05 June 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139382656.024
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  • The Netherlands
  • Compiled by The Bar of Brussels
  • Book: Professional Secrecy of Lawyers in Europe
  • Online publication: 05 June 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139382656.024
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • The Netherlands
  • Compiled by The Bar of Brussels
  • Book: Professional Secrecy of Lawyers in Europe
  • Online publication: 05 June 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139382656.024
Available formats
×