Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-tj2md Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-17T16:34:38.336Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

3 - Spanish product liability today – adapting to the ‘new’ rules

from PART I - Country reports

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2009

Miquel Martín-Casals
Affiliation:
Professor of Civil Law Observatory of European and Comparative Private Law, University of Girona (Spain)
Get access

Summary

Introduction: the application of the Spanish Product Liability Act by the courts

Until 2003 the judgments of the Spanish Supreme Court were referring to the Spanish Product Liability Act (Ley de responsabilidad civil por los daños causados por productos defectuosos (hereafter, Product Liability Act or LRPD)) only obiter dicta, as a sort of reminder of its existence. They dealt with facts that had taken place before the new regulation implementing the Product Liability Directive was applicable and, therefore, they applied the rules of the General Act for the Protection of Consumers and Users (Ley general para la defensa de consumidores y usuarios (hereafter, Consumer Protection Act or LGDCU)), an Act which had governed product liability in Spain since 1984.

Errors and omissions excepted, STS 21.2.2003 (RJ 2003\2133) was the first judgment where the Supreme Court applied the Product Liability Act implementing the Directive. In this case, a bottle of white lemonade exploded while the claimant was putting it into his shopping basket in the supermarket. The splinters of glass injured both his face and one eye, and caused him the partial loss of sight in his left eye. The victim filed a claim against the soft-drink and the bottling companies seeking a damages award of 36,520,000 Pta (approx. €220,000). The Court of First Instance decided in favour of the claimant, but awarded the substantially lesser sum of 7,720,000 Pta (approx. €46,000), and this judgment was confirmed by the Court of Appeal and, finally, by the Supreme Court.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×