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Part III - Understanding the Consequences of Presenteeism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 August 2018

Cary L. Cooper
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
Luo Lu
Affiliation:
National Taiwan University
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Presenteeism at Work , pp. 181 - 254
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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