Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-bh266 Total loading time: 0.347 Render date: 2022-01-29T11:26:49.159Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

Andrew Wallace
Affiliation:
Carleton University, Ottawa
Get access

Summary

The book’s conclusion follows the fact of Rome east rather than west via a seventeenth-century translation of Ovid’s Tristia—a collection of poems written by Ovid near the Black Sea during the years following his exile from Rome. These translations see a former grammar-school boy reconstructing, from the temporal distance of manhood and maturity, a popular curriculum text and, by necessary extension, revisiting the scene of his own instruction. Ovid’s meditations on the subject of what it means to live apart from Rome, and his expressions of fear that Rome’s language is slipping from his grip, provide a final backdrop against which to reframe the book’s arguments.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Presence of Rome in Medieval and Early Modern Britain
Texts, Artefacts and Beliefs
, pp. 219 - 223
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Conclusion
  • Andrew Wallace, Carleton University, Ottawa
  • Book: The Presence of Rome in Medieval and Early Modern Britain
  • Online publication: 18 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108866071.007
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Conclusion
  • Andrew Wallace, Carleton University, Ottawa
  • Book: The Presence of Rome in Medieval and Early Modern Britain
  • Online publication: 18 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108866071.007
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Andrew Wallace, Carleton University, Ottawa
  • Book: The Presence of Rome in Medieval and Early Modern Britain
  • Online publication: 18 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108866071.007
Available formats
×