Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.867 Render date: 2021-12-04T18:39:33.440Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 7 - Preimplantation genetics

from Section 1 - Background

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2009

Joyce Harper
Affiliation:
University College London
Get access

Summary

A number of research and clinical studies have confirmed high frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities in human oocytes and embryos. Chromosomal imbalance in oocytes can result from loss or gain of individual chromatids or whole chromosomes. The underlying causes remain to be fully elucidated, but important modifying factors include the number and location of chiasmata and maternal age. Aneuploidy is a major cause of congenital abnormalities, mental retardation, and miscarriage. However, most of the chromosome abnormalities detected in human embryos are likely to be lethal at very early embryonic stages, and are probably incompatible with the formation of a clinical pregnancy. Many fertility clinics now screen the embryos produced during in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle in order to identify those that are chromosomally normal. Screening the oocytes/embryos from these patients for aneuploidy using PGS may be particularly beneficial in terms of IVF outcome.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×