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Section 3 - Ethics and the future

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2009

Joyce Harper
Affiliation:
University College London
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Summary

This chapter considers ethical and legal aspects of preimplantation genetic testing, which includes both preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). It first comments briefly on some of the objections presented by critics of PGD. The chapter next addresses some of the moral conditions for clinical PGD. It then focuses on some of the main ethical issues regarding PGD, more in particular on the debate about controversial indications. In the context of regular prenatal diagnosis, the principle of respect for autonomy is of utmost importance. The chapter further deals with a standard type of screening (screening for triploidy), an experimental one (screening for aneuploidy), and a possible future approach (comprehensive genetic screening). New technologies may permit genetic screening for nearly all chromosomal aberrations and many of the common Mendelian disorders and susceptibilities for complex disorders at once.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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  • Ethics and the future
  • Edited by Joyce Harper, University College London
  • Book: Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis
  • Online publication: 09 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511581571.018
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  • Ethics and the future
  • Edited by Joyce Harper, University College London
  • Book: Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis
  • Online publication: 09 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511581571.018
Available formats
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Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Ethics and the future
  • Edited by Joyce Harper, University College London
  • Book: Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis
  • Online publication: 09 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511581571.018
Available formats
×