Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-mtzzk Total loading time: 0.528 Render date: 2022-06-26T12:23:52.658Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Introduction: An overview of the volume

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2009

Daniel L. M. Kennedy
Affiliation:
Professor of Law, University of Minnesota Law School
James D. Southwick
Affiliation:
Professor of Law, University of Minnesota Law School
Daniel L. M. Kennedy
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
James D. Southwick
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
Get access

Summary

This is a book about current problems affecting the law and institutions of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The particular problems treated in this book have recently risen to particular prominence due to the WTO's decision, at its November 2001 Ministerial Meeting in Doha, Qatar, to launch a new round of trade negotiations. The need to deal with these issues was a key reason for launching the new negotiations, while the problems themselves, if not resolved, will stand as obstacles to the success of those negotiations.

In recognition of Professor Robert E. Hudec's scholarly contributions to international trade law, participants at the conference in his honor were invited to employ, in their treatment of the WTO problems they had chosen to discuss, a particular analytical approach for which Hudec's scholarship is known. Known to conference participants as “Transcending the Ostensible,” the approach directs particular attention to the possibility that WTO legal institutions, like other international legal institutions, will function in unexpected ways due to the political and economic conditions of the international environment in which they have been created, and in which they operate. Like all international legal institutions, WTO legal institutions are designed to affect the behavior of governments, rather than private persons and institutions. Government behavior is determined by the domestic political forces engaged on the issue in question.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Political Economy of International Trade Law
Essays in Honor of Robert E. Hudec
, pp. 1 - 10
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×