Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-hb754 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-03-02T00:02:59.562Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

19 - The placenta and developmental programming

Some reflections

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Graham J. Burton
Affiliation:
Department of Anatomy, University of Cambridge
David J. P. Barker
Affiliation:
MRC Epidemiology Resource Centre, University of Southampton
Ashley Moffett
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge
Kent Thornburg
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR
Get access

Summary

The concept of developmental programming of future health has had a galvanizing impact on thinking, both by those concerned with the aetiology of disease in adult life and its impact on future global human health, and by those interested in developmental biological mechanisms. There is strong evidence of long-term programming taking place in the neonatal period in the marked inverse relationship between neonatal microbial exposure and later airways hyper-reactivity. There is extensive evidence that normally grown substantially preterm fetuses have a life course very different from their intrauterine contemporaries; thus they are programmed differently following early expulsion from the uterus. The roots of the developmental programming paradigm lie in medical epidemiology and in the impact of earlier environmental experiences. Programming provides ever more challenging questions, and some of the answers are beginning to emerge with regard to establishing the role of the placenta in this critical process.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×