Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-w6m4b Total loading time: 0.415 Render date: 2022-06-29T04:44:37.206Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

7 - Phenomenology of magnetospheric radio emissions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2009

Get access

Summary

The radio spectrum of Jupiter spanning the frequency range from below 10 kHz to above 3 GHz is dominated by strong nonthermal radiation generated in the planet's inner magnetosphere and probably upper ionosphere. At frequencies above about 100 MHz, a continuous component of emission is generated by synchrotron radiation from trapped electrons between equatorial distances of about 1.3 and 3 Rj. This component exhibits a broad spectral peak at decimetric (DIM) wavelengths, distinct longitudinal asymmetries arising from asymmetries in Jupiter's magnetic field, and slow intensity variations that are presumably related to temporal changes in the energy, pitch angle, or spatial distributions of the radiating electrons. High resolution mapping of this component will probably continue to provide detailed information on the inner magnetosphere structure that is presently unobtainable by other means. Jupiter's most intense radio emissions occur in the frequency range between a few tenths of a MHz and 39.5 MHz. This decameter-wavelength (DAM) component is characterized by complex, highly organized structure in the frequency-time domain and by a strong dependence on the longitude of the observer and in some cases, of Io. The DAM component is thought to be generated near the electron cyclotron frequency in and above the ionosphere on magnetic field lines that thread the Io plasma torus, but neither the specific location(s) of the radio source(s) nor the specific plasma emission process are firmly established. At frequencies below about 1 MHz there exist two independent components of emission that have spectral peaks at kilometer (KOM) wavelengths. One is bursty, relatively broadbanded (typically covering 10 to 1000 kHz), and strongly modulated by planetary rotation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1983

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
186
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×