Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-zzcdp Total loading time: 0.309 Render date: 2021-12-01T17:01:06.688Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

11 - Scandinavian

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2010

Carlos Gussenhoven
Affiliation:
Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Norwegian and Swedish have intonation systems with pitch accents signalling information status, as has English. However, these languages also have a binary tone contrast on the syllable with primary stress. The two terms in the opposition are referred as Accent 1 and Accent 2 (Bruce 1977). The challenge to separate the intonational tones from the lexical tones was successfully met by Bruce (1977) on the basis of the collection and analysis of a carefully composed corpus of read speech in which lexical tone, intonational focus, and position in the sentence were varied orthogonally. This work played a seminal role in the development of Pierrehumbert's 1980 autosegmental-metrical description of English, as attested by many of the contributions in his Festschrift (Horne 2000).

In section 11.2, I reproduce Bruce's analysis of Stockholm Swedish, including Gussenhoven and Bruce's (1999) modification of the analysis of compounds. Section 11.4 describes East Norwegian on the basis of Kristoffersen's (2000) account of Fretheim (1992), Fretheim and Nilsen (1991). There, I reinterpret their notion of ‘Accent Phrase’ as the stretch of speech spanned by the left-aligned L* and the right-aligned H-tone of an intonational pitch accent L*H, which implies a ‘privative’ analysis of the Norwegian tones, as in Lorentz (1995). Finally, section 11.6 tentatively suggests an account of the development of Danish stϕd from Accent 1.

A number of analyses are possible for the tone contrast, in part depending on the facts of the language variety in question. First, the opposition may be between two tones, a non-privative analysis, or between tone (Accent 2) and absence of tone (Accent 1), a privative analysis.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Scandinavian
  • Carlos Gussenhoven, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Book: The Phonology of Tone and Intonation
  • Online publication: 18 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616983.012
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Scandinavian
  • Carlos Gussenhoven, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Book: The Phonology of Tone and Intonation
  • Online publication: 18 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616983.012
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Scandinavian
  • Carlos Gussenhoven, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Book: The Phonology of Tone and Intonation
  • Online publication: 18 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616983.012
Available formats
×