Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.267 Render date: 2021-12-04T23:32:48.996Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

3 - Critical empiricism criticized: the case of Freud

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2009

Get access

Summary

Within the last decade philosophy of science has developed greatly as a special discipline. Perhaps inevitably, the internal controversies which this expansion has engendered have been difficult to relate to the more general philosophical field. The difficult relationship between philosophy in general and philosophy of science in particular, is an aspect of the difficult relationship between philosophy and scientific theory. The back numbers of reputable journals are littered with articles which either utilize some illusory science as a raw material for practising philosophy on, or which hew so closely to a few minor scientific maxims that their philosophy is deformed. Both these approaches tend towards a sort of eclectic and abstract legislation about the nature of science and the conduct of scientific activity.

In the course of this paper we shall have occasion inter alia to deal with the following one-sided perspectives. One is the resort to ‘common sense’ as a court of appeal; often involved with an essentialist view of causation, in particular a reduction to ‘constant conjunction’. A second common source of confusion stems from rigid application of criteria based on falsificationist principles. We shall be finding this of particular interest since falsificationism depends upon certain assumptions, a metaphysical theory of truth and a particular view of the relations between facts and theories: assumptions which actually deflect that particular tendency within philosophy of science from dealing with those very methodological problems of scientific discovery and explanation which it formally sets itself.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1982

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
2
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×