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7 - Entropy

from Part II - The Atomic Origins of Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2020

Brent Fultz
Affiliation:
California Institute of Technology
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Summary

The physical origins of entropy are explained. Configurational entropy in the point approximation was used previously, but Chapter 7 shows how configurational entropy can be calculated more accurately with cluster expansion methods, and the pair approximation is developed in some detail. Atom vibrations are usually the largest source of entropy in materials, and the origin of vibrational entropy is explained in Section 7.4. Vibrational entropy is used in new calculations of the critical temperatures of ordering and unmixing, which were done in Chapter 2 with configurational entropy alone. For metals there is a heat capacity and entropy from thermal excitations of electrons near the Fermi surface, and this increases with temperature. At high temperatures, electron excitations can alter the vibrational modes, and there is some discussion about how the different types of entropy interact.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Entropy
  • Brent Fultz, California Institute of Technology
  • Book: Phase Transitions in Materials
  • Online publication: 24 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108641449.010
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  • Entropy
  • Brent Fultz, California Institute of Technology
  • Book: Phase Transitions in Materials
  • Online publication: 24 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108641449.010
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Entropy
  • Brent Fultz, California Institute of Technology
  • Book: Phase Transitions in Materials
  • Online publication: 24 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108641449.010
Available formats
×