Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7c2ld Total loading time: 0.909 Render date: 2021-12-07T00:24:25.115Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 10 - Polycystic ovarian syndrome

from Section 3: - Difficulties and complication of ovarian stimulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2011

Mohamed Aboulghar
Affiliation:
Cairo University and the IVF-ET Center
Botros Rizk
Affiliation:
University of South Alabama
Get access

Summary

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most prevalent endocrinopathies, affecting 5-10% of women of reproductive age. PCOS is one of the commonest causes of anovulatory infertility. The characteristic clinical features of PCOS include menstrual irregularity such as oligomenorrhoea and signs of hyperandrogenaemia including hirsutism, acne, and/or obesity. A recent study observed a significant and progressive correlation between body mass index (BMI) and both blood pressure and clinical features in women with PCOS. Clomifene citrate has been the standard treatment for induction of ovulation in women with anovulatory infertility for many years. The beneficial endocrinologic and morphologic effects of laparoscopic ovarian diathermy appear to be sustained for up to 9 years in most patients with PCOS. In vitro maturation (IVM) protocols are now a valuable alternative to conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) as a strategy to prevent ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS).
Type
Chapter
Information
Ovarian Stimulation , pp. 87 - 102
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×