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Chapter 7 - Pediatric orthopedic emergencies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2013

Michael C. Bond
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
Andrew D. Perron
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Maine Medical Center, Portland
Michael K. Abraham
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
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Summary

This chapter presents the key facts, description, physical examinations, epidemiology, initial evaluation, tests, treatment, and prognosis of pediatric orthopedic fractures such as growth plate injury, Osgood-Schlatter disease, child abuse/non-accidental trauma, spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality (SCIWORA), transient synovitis, and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Bones in children remodel at a more rapid rate than adults, making closed reduction a viable treatment modality for many fractures that would require operative repair in adults. Treatment involves splinting or casting for 4 weeks and outpatient orthopedic follow-up. Some centers immobilize for even shorter periods with similar results. Casting is the treatment of choice and these injuries rarely need operative repair. Plain radiographs are the screening test of choice for SCFE. An MRI may be used for patients whose initial radiographs are inconclusive and there is a high degree of suspicion.
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Chapter
Information
Orthopedic Emergencies
Expert Management for the Emergency Physician
, pp. 165 - 177
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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