Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 0.396 Render date: 2021-12-06T06:49:02.103Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

III - The Search

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2011

Anu Kapur
Affiliation:
Department of Geography, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
Get access

Summary

Where does one begin? What is the first step? The library undoubtedly is the finest institution of civilisation. An ideal library is an ocean of published knowledge. World-class libraries exemplify this description. The Library of Congress is the oldest federal cultural institution of the United States of America. It has a collection of more than 130 million items, which includes 29 million books and other printed materials. Taking a walk along its bookshelves spanning over 850 kilometres would be like traversing four times the distance between Delhi and Agra. The library of Princeton University includes nearly 6.2 million books, 36,000 linear feet of manuscripts, and impressive holdings of rare books, prints and archives. The University of Cambridge has a collection of 4.4 million while the Oxford University Library Service holds 11 million items.

Compared to these world-class centres, the libraries in India seem like ponds. The Parliament Library, the largest in Delhi and the second largest in India after the National Library at Kolkata, holds 1.27 million volumes of printed books, reports, government publications, reports, debates, gazettes and other documents. While it would be unfair to compare an ocean with a pond, what is of help is the fact that the two are not isolated. As a hydrological cycle connects a pond, lake and an ocean, such are the currents of globalisation. Today, trade and the Internet allow a larger access to publications than was ever possible.

Type
Chapter
Information
On Disasters in India , pp. 14 - 38
Publisher: Foundation Books
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • The Search
  • Anu Kapur, Department of Geography, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
  • Book: On Disasters in India
  • Online publication: 26 October 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9788175968479.003
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • The Search
  • Anu Kapur, Department of Geography, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
  • Book: On Disasters in India
  • Online publication: 26 October 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9788175968479.003
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • The Search
  • Anu Kapur, Department of Geography, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
  • Book: On Disasters in India
  • Online publication: 26 October 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9788175968479.003
Available formats
×