Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-vl2kb Total loading time: 0.396 Render date: 2021-12-06T00:28:55.634Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

17 - Agonistic and affiliative relationships in a blue monkey group

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2009

Paul F. Whitehead
Affiliation:
Capital Community College, Hartford & Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven
Clifford J. Jolly
Affiliation:
New York University
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The literature often contrasts features of the social organization of cercopithecines with that of other taxa, including colobines (McKenna, 1979; Borries et al., 1994; Newton and Dunbar 1994), platyrhines (O'Brien, 1993), and apes (Watts, 1994). Most of what we know about “cercopithecine” social organization, however, derives from studies of only a few species, namely baboons (Papio and Theropithecus), some macaques (Macaca), and vervet monkeys and their relatives (Chlorocebus) (Erwin and Zucker, 1987; Strier, 1990), even though these species do not provide a representative sample of cercopithecine genera or of habitats in which cercopithecine monkeys live. In particular, the social organization of the African forest-dwelling cercopithecins (Cercopithecus, Miopithecus, and Allenopithecus) is poorly known. The forested habitat and arboreal habits of these monkeys make study in the wild difficult, and captive groups of naturalistic size do not exist.

Some recent publications have begun to provide information on cercopithecine species previously overlooked, especially lesser-known papionins, mostly studied in captivity (e.g. Baker and Estep, 1985; Ehardt, 1988; Oi, 1990; Thierry et al., 1990; Gust and Gordon, 1993, 1994; Gust, 1994, 1995). In an attempt to correct prevalent generalizations about cercopithecine social organization by including cercopithecins, Rowell (1988) contrasted their social organization with that of the better-known papionins.

Type
Chapter
Information
Old World Monkeys , pp. 453 - 479
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
29
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×