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Chapter 44 - Trauma in Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2019

Tauqeer Husain
Affiliation:
Ashford and St Peter’s NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey
Roshan Fernando
Affiliation:
Womens Wellness and Research Centre, Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar
Scott Segal
Affiliation:
Wake Forest University, North Carolina
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Summary

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Chapter
Information
Obstetric Anesthesiology
An Illustrated Case-Based Approach
, pp. 243 - 246
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Mendez-Figueroa, H, Dahlke, JD, Vrees, RA, Rouse, DJ. Trauma in pregnancy: an updated systematic review. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2013; 209(1):110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shah, KH, Simons, RK, Holbrook, T, et al. Trauma in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes. J Trauma 1998; 45(1):8386.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Celso, B, Tepas, J, Langland-Orban, B, et al. A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing outcome of severely injured patients treated in trauma centers following the establishment of trauma systems. J Trauma 2006; 60(2):371–78.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huber-Wagner, S, Lefering, R, Qvick, LM, et al. Effect of whole-body CT during trauma resuscitation on survival: a retrospective, multicentre study. Lancet 2009; 373:1455–61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eastridge, BJ, Salinas, J, McManus, JG, et al. Hypotension begins at 110 mmHg: redefining “hypotension” with data. J Trauma 2007; 63:291–99.Google Scholar
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Frith, D, Goslings, JC, Gaardner, C, et al. Definition and drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy: clinical and experimental investigations. J Thromb Haemost 2010; 8(9):1919–25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Holcolmb, JB, Tilley, BC, Baraniuk, S, et al. Transfusion of plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 ratio and mortality in patients with severe trauma. The PROPPR Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA 2015; 313(5):471–82.Google Scholar
Mallaiah, S, Barclay, P, Harrod, I, Chevannes, C,Bhalla, A. Introduction of an algorithm for ROTEM-guided fibrinogen concentrate administration in major obstetric haemorrhage. Anaesthesia 2015; 70:166–75.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
CRASH-2 Trial Collaborators. Effects of tranexamic acid on death, vascular occlusive events, and blood transfusion in trauma patients with significant haemorrhage (CRASH-2): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2010; 376:2332.CrossRef
CRASH-2 Trial Collaborators. The importance of early treatment with tranexamic acid in bleeding trauma patients: an exploratory analysis of the CRASH-2 randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2011; 377:1096–101.
Eager, R, Sutton, J, Spedding, R, et al. Use of anti-D immunoglobulin in maternal trauma. Emerg Med J 2003; 20:498.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Pregnancy: routine anti-D prophylaxis for RhD-negative women, 2008. Available at www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta156/resources/guidance-routine-antenatal-antid-prophylaxis-for-women-who-are-rhesus-d-negative-pdf (accessed August 2015).

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