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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2011

Curt Cardwell
Affiliation:
Drake University, Iowa
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Summary

In 1994, James Baker, wealthy lawyer, scion of the Texas elite, and long-time Washington insider, delivered a speech before the Rotary Club of Washington, DC. The occasion was the club's annual foreign relations seminar, a subject on which Baker knew a great deal. Out of government in 1994, Baker had a distinguished record of public service, one that placed him at the center of the “Reagan revolution,” as former Hollywood actor and California governor Ronald Reagan's victory in the 1980 presidential campaign has come to be known. A former Marine Corps officer, Baker managed Reagan's victorious 1980 presidential run, served as White House chief of staff during Reagan's first term, secretary of the treasury during his second, and also was a fixture on the National Security Council. Part of this tenure occurred at the height of the “Reagan Cold War,” when tensions between the two superpowers once again rose to a fever pitch before settling into cautious coexistence. Under George Herbert Walker Bush, Baker served as secretary of state during one of the most momentous times in modern history – the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War. Baker, it is fair to say, was a Cold War warrior par excellence, which is what makes his comments before the Rotary Club on that day in 1994 so startling.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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References

Gardner, Richard N., Sterling-Dollar Diplomacy: Anglo-American Collaboration in the Reconstruction of Multilateral Trade (Oxford, United Kingdom: Clarendon Press, 1956)Google Scholar
Freeland, Richard, The Truman Doctrine and the Origins of McCarthyism: Foreign Policy, Domestic Politics, and Internal Security, 1946–1948 (New York: Knopf, 1972)Google Scholar
McCullough, David, Truman (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1992)Google Scholar
Gaddis, John Lewis, We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998)Google Scholar

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  • Introduction
  • Curt Cardwell, Drake University, Iowa
  • Book: NSC 68 and the Political Economy of the Early Cold War
  • Online publication: 05 July 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511835247.001
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  • Introduction
  • Curt Cardwell, Drake University, Iowa
  • Book: NSC 68 and the Political Economy of the Early Cold War
  • Online publication: 05 July 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511835247.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Curt Cardwell, Drake University, Iowa
  • Book: NSC 68 and the Political Economy of the Early Cold War
  • Online publication: 05 July 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511835247.001
Available formats
×