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Part V - Private Law (Rule-Setting) beyond the State

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 April 2021

Stefan Grundmann
Affiliation:
European University Institute, Florence
Hans-W. Micklitz
Affiliation:
European University Institute, Florence
Moritz Renner
Affiliation:
Universität Mannheim, Germany
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Summary

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Type
Chapter
Information
New Private Law Theory
A Pluralist Approach
, pp. 435 - 516
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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