Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-t82dr Total loading time: 0.247 Render date: 2021-11-30T19:16:59.517Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

1 - Theoretical frontiers of environmental economics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 January 2010

Carlo Carraro
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Venezia
Domenico Siniscalco
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Torino, Italy
Get access

Summary

Environmental economics was the subject of a comprehensive research programme in the 1960s and 1970s. This programme dealt with a wide range of issues and policy problems, such as the economics of natural resources, the methods and problems in the correction of externalities, the management of common property goods, the economics of nature preservation. Against this background, suitable analytical tools were provided by the theory of non-renewable and renewable resources; the theory of missing markets; Pigovian taxation and the theory of property rights; the economics of public goods; welfare economics. All in all, the research programme was very successful and in the following decade it gave rise to several textbooks, from Baumol and Oates (1975) to Siebert (1987), Pearce and Turner (1990). At the beginning of the 1990s, no less Partha Dasgupta (1990) was claiming that environmental issues were ‘very cold’ as topics for analytical investigation and ‘dead’ as research problems.

In recent years, however, scientists have highlighted a set of ‘new’ environmental phenomena, such as global warming, ozone layer depletion, acid rains, fresh water and ocean pollution, desertification, deforestation and the loss of bio-diversity (e.g., cf. UNEP (1991)). Some of the above phenomena, such as ozone layer depletion, were newly discovered; some others were known, but attracted new attention, due to their scale and socio-economic implications, such as global warming. In both cases, the new environmental problems entered the agenda of policy makers and became the centre of world-wide debate and a massive diplomatic effort, culminating in the UN Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 (for a discussion, see World Bank (1992), Siniscalco (1992), IPCC (1995)).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×