Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-797576ffbb-bqjwj Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2023-12-09T22:48:06.427Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "corePageComponentGetUserInfoFromSharedSession": true, "coreDisableEcommerce": false, "useRatesEcommerce": true } hasContentIssue false

9 - Church and Sacraments

from Part I - Doctrines

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2022

Michael Allen
Affiliation:
Reformed Theological Seminary, Florida
Get access

Summary

The church is in one sense unique among the loci of Christian doctrine: the church is both the subject of believing but also an object of belief; the church formulates and articulates doctrine while at the same time itself being an object of doctrinal reflection. It is the church universal that formulates the creeds (‘We believe’); yet part of what is believed involves certain dogmas about the church (that it is ‘one, holy, catholic, and apostolic’ and that it acknowledges ‘one baptism for the forgiveness of sins’). We call the discipline of reflecting on what we believe about the church ‘ecclesiology’. That we have beliefs about the church indicates, moreover, that while in certain ways the church shares the same forms and conditions of its empirical existence as other societies and organisations in the world (for example, it is observable and spatio-temporal), the church is also unique as an organisation by virtue of its oneness, holiness, catholicity, and apostolicity. Indeed, the church is (with Israel) a community that is different from all others in that it is a community directly created by God: the church (as with Israel) is that body of people about whom we believe God speaks the words, ‘I shall be your God and you shall be My people’ (Jer. 30:22). We have faith that the church is God’s people – faith in the invisible activity of God within the visible, empirical society of people called ‘church’.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Further Reading

Congar, Y. (2013), I Believe in the Holy Spirit, Volume 2 (New York: Crossroad).Google Scholar
Dulles, A. (1976), Models of the Church: A Critical Assessment of the Church in All Its Aspects (Dublin: Gill & Macmillan).Google Scholar
Greggs, T. (2019), Dogmatic Ecclesiology, Volume 1: The Priestly Catholicity of the Church (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic).Google Scholar
Hardy, D. W. (2000), Finding the Church (London: SCM).Google Scholar
Healy, N. (2000), Church, World and the Christian Life: Practical-Prophetic Ecclesiology (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Küng, H. (1968), The Church (London: Burns & Oates).Google Scholar
Moltmann, J. (1977), The Church in the Power of the Spirit: A Contribution to Messianic Ecclesiology (London: SCM).Google Scholar
Murray, P., ed. (2008), Receptive Ecumenism and the Call to Catholic Learning: Exploring a Way for Contemporary Ecumenism (Oxford: Oxford University Press).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ramsey, M. (1990), The Gospel and the Catholic Church (London: SPCK).Google Scholar
Torrance, J. B. (1996), Worship, Community and the Triune God of Grace (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press).Google Scholar
Torrance, T. F. (1993), Royal Priesthood (Edinburgh: T&T Clark).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ward, Pete, ed. (2012), Perspectives on Ecclesiology and Ethnography (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans).Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×