Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-vtfg7 Total loading time: 0.486 Render date: 2022-05-28T21:01:55.051Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

10 - Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 October 2009

David M. A. Mann
Affiliation:
Clinical Neurosciences Research Group University of Manchester, UK
Margaret M. Esiri
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Virginia M. -Y. Lee
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
John Q. Trojanowski
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Down's syndrome (DS) occurs in about 1/800 live births (Adams et al., 1981) and accounts for about 17% of the mentally handicapped population (Heller, 1969). An association between DS and dementia was first noted well over a century ago by Fraser & Mitchell (1876), who wrote ‘in not a few instances, however, death was attributed to nothing more than a general decay – a sort of precipitated senility’. Nevertheless, it was not until much later (Struwe, 1929; Jervis, 1948) that the linkage between this ‘senile decay’ and the occurrence within the brain of the pathological lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD), namely senile plaques (SP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), was noted. More recently, a number of studies have shown there to be an excess of DS births among the relatives of AD patients, particularly early onset AD families (Heston et al., 1981; Heyman et al., 1983; Broe et al., 1990; Van Duijn et al., 1991). Conversely, there is an increased risk of AD among mothers of DS children (Yatham et al., 1988; Schupf et al., 1994). Such observations support the pathological observations of shared etiopathogenetic causes for AD and DS. Life expectancy for people with DS has progressively risen with nearly half individuals living to beyond 50 years of age (Dupont et al., 1986; Baird & Sadovnick, 1987; Holland & Moss 1997) and with this the problems of ‘precocious ageing’ and dementia in DS have gained prominence.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×