Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-hb754 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-28T06:16:26.410Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

7 - Diabetes mellitus and tardive dyskinesia

from Part II - Clinical aspects of tardive dyskinesia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 October 2009

Ramzy Yassa
Affiliation:
Douglas Hospital, Quebec
N. P. V. Nair
Affiliation:
Douglas Hospital, Quebec
Dilip V. Jeste
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
Get access

Summary

In spite of considerable research, tardive dyskinesia remains an enigmatic syndrome: Its pathologic basis is not understood, the role of neuroleptic treatment in its pathogenesis remains controversial insofar as chronic schizophrenic patients are concerned, and it is not clear why, with comparable exposures to neuroleptics, some patients develop the syndrome and others do not. It seems unlikely that this differential risk pattern can be explained by pharmacokinetic considerations alone. Also, the search for patient characteristics associated with greater risk for developing tardive dyskinesia has yielded largely disparate findings. Indeed, increasing age is the one factor that has consistently been associated with higher incidences and prevalences, increased severity, and stubborn persistence of tardive dyskinesia.

Diabetes Mellitus and Tardive Dyskinesia

On the basis of incidental observations and findings from pilot studies, we earlier hypothesized that impaired glucose metabolism is associated with increased risk for tardive dyskinesia (Mukherjee et al., 1985; Mukherjee, Bilder, & Sackeim 1986). That view was based on the following observations: (1) In two separate studies, the proportion of tardive dyskinesia patients also diagnosed as having non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was considerably higher than would have been expected on the basis of the known rates of NIDDM in the general population (Mukherjee et al., 1985, 1986). (2) On average, fasting blood glucose concentrations were found to be significantly higher in patients with tardive dyskinesia than in patients without tardive dyskinesia, an effect that remained significant after controlling for variance due to age and gender (Mukherjee et al., 1985).

Type
Chapter
Information
Neuroleptic-induced Movement Disorders
A Comprehensive Survey
, pp. 82 - 98
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1996

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×