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3 - What Is a Social Network?

from Part I - Thinking Structurally

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 September 2023

Craig M. Rawlings
Affiliation:
Duke University, North Carolina
Jeffrey A. Smith
Affiliation:
Nova Scotia Health Authority
James Moody
Affiliation:
Duke University, North Carolina
Daniel A. McFarland
Affiliation:
Stanford University, California
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Summary

We outline the core concepts of network analysis, issues of research design, and data collection for different structural questions.

Type
Chapter
Information
Network Analysis
Integrating Social Network Theory, Method, and Application with R
, pp. 45 - 66
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

Suggested Further Reading

Gibbons, Alan. 1985. Algorithmic Graph Theory. New York: Cambridge University Press. (A classic exposition of primary algorithmic approaches to manipulating, searching, and performing search operations on network objects. While some of the routines have been superseded by newer algorithms, this publication provides basics to get anyone started in this line of work.)Google Scholar
Harary, Frank. 1969. Graph Theory. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley. (The classic work in the basics of graph theory.)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kivelä, Mikko, Arenas, Alex, Barthelemy, Marc et al. 2014. “Multilayer Networks.” Journal of Complex Networks 2: 203–71. (Multilayer networks are one of the most general ways to bind multiple types of nodes and relations in a single analysis object; the approach has proven useful for both cross-context studies and unique approaches to dynamic modeling of networks.)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richards, William, and Seary, Andrew. 2000. “Eigen Analysis of Networks.” Journal of Social Structure 1(2): 117. (Eigen structures are key to many network metrics, although their use and mathematical foundations are often understudied in social sciences. This work provides a gentle introduction to what they are and why they matter.)Google Scholar

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