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1 - ‘In matters of art friendship should not count’: Stanford and Howells

from PART I - Howells the Stylist

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2013

Phillip A. Cooke
Affiliation:
Lecturer in Composition at the University of Aberdeen
David Maw
Affiliation:
Tutor and Research Fellow in Music at Oriel College, Oxford, holding Lectureships also at Christ Church, The Queen's and Trinity Colleges
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Summary

Where Stanford the teacher is due for discussion time is not pressing. The paramountcy that was his so fitfully, but often so brilliantly and in so many fields was, in one sphere of his genius, unquestioned, undimmed, and (in our own history) unrivalled. One could so easily devote a whole address to the teacher: and for acknowledgement by any man lucky enough to have known him as such, a life-time would seem too little.

Although his reputation as a composer is still the subject of continuing scholarly exploration, the position of Charles Villiers Stanford as one of the most notable musical educators in Britain in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has been well documented both officially and in numerous anecdotal memories. Trough his positions at the University of Cambridge and the Royal College of Music (RCM), Stanford had unprecedented access to much of Britain's emerging musical talent, and the list of students who passed through his teaching rooms in both establishments could double as a ‘Who's Who’ of British music of the early twentieth century. While the quotation contained within the title of this chapter is drawn from correspondence between Stanford and the violinist/composer Joseph Joachim, it may serve as an interesting pause for thought on the nature of the relationship between this professor and his many students.

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Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2013

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