Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-r5zm4 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-23T19:08:47.721Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

8 - The Suspended Voice of Amália Rodrigues

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2014

Gabriela Cruz
Affiliation:
University of Michigan
Craig A. Monson
Affiliation:
Professor of Musicology at Washington University (St Louis, Missouri)
Roberta Montemorra Marvin
Affiliation:
Teaches music at the University of Iowa
Get access

Summary

The search for authenticity, nearly everywhere we find it in modern times, is bound up with a radical rejection of things as they are.

—Marshall Berman, The Politics of Authenticity

For Portuguese music as for Portuguese politics, 1926 marked a historical watershed. The military coup of May 28, 1926, led by General Manuel Gomes da Costa, put an end to the First Republic and ushered in a conservative dictatorship that by 1933 had mutated into a full-fledged authoritarian regime, the self-proclaimed Estado Novo. The year of the coup also saw the introduction of electrically reproduced sound in Portugal, when Columbia Graphophone Company and the Gramophone Company partnered with the local music dealers Valentim de Carvalho and Bazar do Porto in Lisbon and Oporto, respectively. Thus, Portuguese cultural modernity was double-layered from its inception, pairing up conservative political aspirations with the installation of sound in electric circuitry. It is now de rigueur to claim a determinant role for new media technology in the cultural fashioning of the Estado Novo. But the terms of the relationship between the political and the technological remain undertheorized, routinely cast as one of mastermind and executor. In this regard, today's historiographic consensus pays lip-service to the old regime's stated policy, that which the first director of the national radio, Captain Henrique Galvão, voiced in 1935 with expected military redundancy: “The national broadcast, an effort of the Estado Novo, is today like one more volunteering soldier, a new force in the service of the Estado Novo.”

Type
Chapter
Information
Music in Print and Beyond
Hildegard von Bingen to The Beatles
, pp. 180 - 199
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×